S​‌‍‍‍‌‍‌‍‍‍‌‌‌‍‌‌‌‌‌‌​tructure of the Project Report. There is no universally a

S​‌‍‍‍‌‍‌‍‍‍‌‌‌‍‌‌‌‌‌‌​tructure of the Project Report.
There is no universally applicable structure for a project report. This will be influenced by the precise
research question under consideration. However, a typical structure might be as below:
Title
The report must contain a title page with the London South Bank University crest, the title of
the report, the name of the author, student number, the Master’s degree being sought, and
the year of submission. Please see examples on the Moodle site in the “Examples of past
Capstone Business Projects” folder.
Acknowledgements
The report is likely to include an Acknowledgements page – in which acknowledgements are
made to appropriate persons and/or organisations. (this part is optional)
Executive Summary
The report must include an Executive Summary of approximately 250 words immediately
before the Contents page. It should provide answers for the following questions:
• What was the organisational or managerial context for your research?
• What were your research questions, and why were they important?
• How did you go about the research?
• What did you find out?
• What conclusions do you draw?
• And what practical recommendations for action follow?Contents
The business project report must include a Contents page, followed by a list of tables and
appendices.
Typical chapters (indicative, not prescriptive sequence)
Introduction
Explain what you are writing about and why it is important. Indicate the theoretical approach
or perspective you will be using and why. Outline your research question(s). If your research is
based in an organisation, then your Introduction is also the place to describe the organisation’s
history, size, products or services (suitably anonymised if necessary).
Critical review of the current academic literature as it relates to your research aims
Should set your research in its wider academic context and show how it supports or contrasts
with the current literature:
• What has already been written about your central issue of concern
• Your evaluation of that previous work
• How the existing research contributes to answering/solving your research
question/problem.
Research methods
In this section, you justify your research approach and design, data collection ​‌‍‍‍‌‍‌‍‍‍‌‌‌‍‌‌‌‌‌‌​and analysis
methods. This is also the place to describe how your research data were obtained, including
issues of access and consent, and to discuss how you have addressed any ethical issues raised
by your research. Please, refer to Appendix 4 for more information about sample size
requirements.
IMPORTANT: YOU MUST USE SECONDARY DATA OR PRIMARY DATA IN YOUR PROJECT. YOU
MUST ANALYSE THE DATA. EXTENDED LITERATURE REVIEW PROJECTS DO NOT MEET THE
REQUOREMENTS OF THIS MODULE AND HENCE WILL FAIL.
Analysis and interpretation of research results
You may find that you need several chapters for the discussion, analysis and interpretation of
your research results. In each chapter you should:
• Present data analysis and results
• Evaluate your results, making a logical sequence of points each of which is supported by
reference to specific data and, where appropriate, relevant literature
• Conclude by explaining what has been achieved in the chapter and how and where in your
business project report you deal with any loose ends.
Conclusions and recommendations
In this section you should cover the following:
• The research questions you have investigated and your answers to those questions. The
answers should be based on the literature review and analysis of primary/secondary data.
It should flow from and be based on the content of the previous sections. You need to
discuss how your study solves the problem that you stated in the Introduction.
• How what you have found relates to previous knowledge, belief or common practice as
discussed in your critical review of the literature
• Lessons learnt from how you have carried out your research (remember that the purpose
of the business project is not only to learn more about your issue of concern, but also to
instil in you a lifelong habit of being researchImplications for practice, and your recommendations for improving practices related to
your research question.
• Acknowledgement of any limitations in the scope or method of your research, and specific
suggestions for further research.
References and bibliography
The Harvard (name and date) system must be used consistently.
Appendices
You may choose to include the following among your appendices:
• Copies of any questionnaires ​‌‍‍‍‌‍‌‍‍‍‌‌‌‍‌‌‌‌‌‌​or interview questions you have used-minded )