Search the web for an artwork that you believe encapsulates the reading in some

Search the web for an artwork that you believe encapsulates the reading in some way. You do not need to include a picture of the artwork in your profile unless it is a creation of your own.
3. Insert the link to the artwork into a Word file and cite the artwork appropriately. This means MLA formatting. Write a corresponding paragraph to two paragraphs max that describes the artwork in relation with the text, including direct quotations and/or paraphrases with in-text citations.
4. See the Purdue Owl on how to cite artwork.
EXAMPLE Note: The following art profile was completed through PowerPoint. You do not, however, have to submit as a PPT slide.**
Example:
“Earth! Fire! Wind! Water! Heart!â€(Collins, Phil.) These lyrics open the theme song and values for the hit 1990s cartoon show, Captain Planet and the Planeteers. The premise of the show: Captain Planet, an elemental god of sorts, comes to Earth’s aid when summoned upon by the planeteers, a group of young adults on the quest to save the world from pollution and eternal damnation. In a world torn apart by pollutants, how can one exist in a realm that has become Hell? In the mid-1700s, Protestants fought a similar battle: to keep themselves out of Hell’s outstretched arms. According to the revivalist preacher, Jonathan Edwards, “Almost every natural man that hears of hell, flatters himself that he shall escape it,â€(212). This revelation correlates with Captain Planet’s ideals: One cannot pollute the planet and expect an eternity in heaven. Minister Edwards adamantly believes people must feel“moved†by God in order to escape his anger. (Baym, 178). Those not moved or believing in God with their entire beings shall feel his rage, ending a pollution of sinners via “earth†(216), “fire†(215), “wind†(214), “water†(215), and “heart […] the sink of sin†(Edwards 212). Similarly, Captain Planet uses the same elements to cleanse the world of “bad guys who like to loot and plunder†(Collins, Phil). Both Captain Planet and the God portrayed by Edwards in his 1741 sermon, “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry Godâ€have a relatable power: they can cleanse the world with the elements of the earth. Ultimately, humanity must feel “movedâ€to escape the clutches of Hell (Baym 178). “The power is yours!â€(Collins, Phil).
Works Cited
Collins, Phil. Captain Planet Theme Song. Edwards, Jonathan. “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God.†The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Shorter Eighth Edition, Volume 1, edited by Nina Baym and Robert Levine, 2013, pp. 209 – 220.