Discussion Board 2 – Chapter 5 from the book In this Discussion Board you will w

Discussion Board 2 – Chapter 5 from the book
In this Discussion Board you will write a letter to a future child and share it with the class. Letter to A Future Child Assignment
In this assignment, you are to compose a letter to a future child before his/her birth if you do not yet have children, or to your current child If you don’t plan on having a child, that is ok, you can use your imagination. This is a letter that would be given to this child on his/her 13th birthday. What qualities should a good parent possess, and why?
Which of your qualities do you believe help make you a successful parent?
Which of your qualities may interfere with your ability to be a good parent?
What are your hopes for your child’s future?
What bits of wisdom have you acquired that you wish to pass on to your child? How will you ensure your child has better than you had, or as good as you had? How can you save your child from your mistakes?
For full credit, you must use the information you have learned this semester. You should include a minimum of two text references. They must be bolded and cite the page number. For example, I learned (here you put in the information you learned from the text and page number in)
Your letter must be between 600-800 words. Please check spelling, grammar, punctuation, and citations. A minimum of 2 replies 150-300 words each. EXAMPLE From a previous student.
Dear Baby,
There are still a few months until we meet, but already I’m busy writing you letters. I started writing things down because I honestly couldn’t stop thinking about you, and because even though I’ve only been carrying you for a matter of months, it already feels like there’s so much to share. It’s all in a tiny journal on my nightstand, one I’ll give you someday when you’re a bit older. There’s a letter about how your dad and I met, another about the day you became a reality, plus others about your grandpa and your grandma and some of the special people who already love you. See? I told you: a sentimental writer.
In all these letters, I find myself imagining the mom I hope to be
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when you arrive. That mom I picture, she’s a tall order, but although there’s a whole lot I can’t plan for, there are also some promises I vow to keep . . .
I promise to begin and end your days with the reminder that I adore you. At night, you’ll hear “I love you” loud and clear, and I promise to wake you up each morning with a soft voice and an open smile, just the way my mom did with me. That might seem like a small thing, but trust me: it makes for a pleasant start to the day, and when you’re a teenager, you’ll be really, really grateful that I’m not shoving the curtains open and yelling for you to get up.
When you try new things, I promise not to show you that I’m a tiny bit (or, more likely, very) scared. Deep down I might be worried or anxious or slightly terrified of what might happen if it doesn’t work out for you, but I won’t let my fears slow you down. I’ll tell you to take chances, to go for it, to trust yourself. I promise to trust you.
I promise to make your birthday a big damn deal. Whether you’re turning 1 or 35, I promise balloons and streamers and surprise parties and the cakes of your choice. Some years you might love that, and other years it might feel sort of cheesy, but when you look back on birthdays past, I promise you’ll know that you were celebrated by the people who cared about you most.
If you mess up in a small way, I promise to acknowledge it, help you, then let it go. And whenever you mess up in a big way, I promise to feel the weight of it and push you to do the same. I promise to let you make those tough mistakes, to address them when I need to, and to keep on loving you all the same. I know that (here you put in the information you learned from the text and page number in)
I promise to be active — to set that example and inspire you to keep moving. I know that (here you put in the information you learned from the text and page number in) There will be after-dinner walks and Sunday morning runs and sunny hikes along the beach. Oh, I promise you sports, too. Plenty of them. Your dad will teach you how to throw a football, how to nail free throws, and I’ll show you the ins and outs of soccer. Swimming, too. All of it or none of it, I promise that can be up to you. Golf, basketball, volleyball, dance — I promise to let you try whatever grabs you and to let you quit when you don’t love it anymore.
I promise to surround you with art of all kinds. To share my love for pop culture, for movies and music and Broadway and Hollywood. I’ll show you the good stuff and the cheesy stuff, the Oscar winners and the terrible comedies, the Beatles and the ’90s pop that makes most people cringe. Over the years I promise to bring you to museums and concerts and plays, and I’ll totally get it when you transform into an all-out crazy fan of something, or someone. When you have a bad day, I promise to listen. Or give you room to breathe, whatever seems best at the time. And when you get upset or angry or really, in-your-bones mad at me, I promise that I’ll try to understand. I’ll practice patience; I’ll try, anyway.
Year after year, I promise to carve out all kinds of a special time for just you and your dad. I know that dads have an important role in raising children. I learned (here you put in the information you learned from the text and page number in)
I promise to be honest with you, even when it’s hard, but I also promise to protect you. When there’s something you need to know, I’ll tell it to you straight, and if it might do more harm than good, I’ll keep it to myself. I promise that I’ll try to recognize the difference.
Speaking of difference, I promise to celebrate what makes you different. I promise to let your weirdness shine.
Mostly, sweet baby, I promise to show you love in all its best forms. I’ll love you and your dad and our friends and our families. With words and with actions I’ll say it and I’ll show it, and if just one of my promises can be kept, let it be this: that you’ll feel it. A love so big that it fills you up, that it makes you feel safe.
I can’t wait to meet you.
Love you already,
Mom
Discussion Board 3 – Chapter 9 from the book
This is one of my favorite videos about the teenage years. It highlights what makes teenagers so special. So often we see just the negative ideas our culture has about them. After watching the video “Teens What Makes Them Tick
” Please discuss
1. The top 3 takeaways from the video (be specific). 2. Briefly explain the 4 types of teens (as discussed in the video). Which can you most or least relate to and why? Do you think those types are accurate in 2020? Explain. Use information from your text to support your answers. 2. According to the video, what are the best ways to parent a teen? Is this consistent with the information from the text (use specific examples)?
3. Relate the information from the video & text (Ch.9 &10) to your own adolescence and/or from parenting a teen.
After you post your response you should reply to at least 2 other student’s posts in the class.
Before completing the Discussion Board assignments, be sure to familiarize yourself with the criteria provided on the grading criteria/rubric. Note that responses should be at least 400-500 words in length. Your replies (minimum of 2 ) to your classmate should be at least 200-300 words. https://vccs.instructure.com/courses/187103/pages/teens-what-makes-them-tick
Video Application 1 – Chapters 3 and 4 from the book
To complete this assignment, you should: Choose a video or podcast below.
Concisely summarize the video/podcast. Discuss how the video specifically applies to one or two specific concepts covered in these chapters in this section of the course. This is one of the three “Video Application” assignment you are required to complete. This assignment requires you to watch a video and apply the concepts covered in this section of the course. The purpose is to engage you in seeing how psychology and the textbook material can be applied to the world around you.
1. Image-maker Alexander Tsiaras shares a powerful medical visualization, showing human development from conception to birth and beyond https://www.ted.com/talks/alexander_tsiaras_conception_to_birth_visualized
Or 2. Steven Pinker’s book The Blank Slate argues that all humans are born with some innate traits. Here, Pinker talks about his thesis, and why some people found it incredibly upsetting. https://www.ted.com/talks/steven_pinker_human_nature_and_the_blank_slate
Other important notes
The goal of this assignment is for you to make connections between the video and the textbook material, so you must read the corresponding chapter before viewing the video.
It is your responsibility to make sure connections between the textbook and video are direct and clear. The most effective way to do this is to directly reference and cite the textbook.
Half the points for this assignment come from the application of the textbook material. Only summarizing the video is not enough.
Your work should be between 500-750 words (no more and no less).
Video Application 2 – Chapters 7 and 8 from the book
Video Application 1 – Chapters 3 and 4 from the book
To complete this assignment, you should: Choose a video or podcast below.
Concisely summarize the video/podcast. Discuss how the video specifically applies to one or two specific concepts covered in these chapters in this section of the course. This is one of the three “Video Application” assignment you are required to complete. This assignment requires you to watch a video and apply the concepts covered in this section of the course. The purpose is to engage you in seeing how psychology and the textbook material can be applied to the world around you.
1. Justin Baldoni wants to start a dialogue with men about redefining masculinity — to figure out ways to be not just good men but good humans. In a warm, personal talk, he shares his effort to reconcile who he is with who the world tells him a man should be.

Or 2.What keeps us happy and healthy as we go through life? If you think it’s fame and money, you’re not alone – but, according to psychiatrist Robert Waldinger, you’re mistaken. As the director of a 75-year-old study on adult development, Waldinger has unprecedented access to data on true happiness and satisfaction

Other important notes
The goal of this assignment is for you to make connections between the video and the textbook material, so you must read the corresponding chapter before viewing the video.
It is your responsibility to make sure connections between the textbook and video are direct and clear. The most effective way to do this is to directly reference and cite the textbook.
Half the points for this assignment come from the application of the textbook material. Only summarizing the video is not enough.
Your work should be between 500-750 words (no more and no less).
THIS WILL BE THE TEXTBOOK THAT WILL BE NEEDED TO COMPLETE THE ASSIGNMENTS. CLICK ON THE URL BELOW AND ON THE TOP CLICK “GET”
http://library.lol/main/FE9CBF68917C82AC02933A018DAC1448