Close connections between bureaucratic agencies interest groups and legislative

Close
connections between bureaucratic agencies interest groups and legislative
committees are known as
The
presidential electors from each state who meet after the popular election to
cast ballots for president and vice president are collectively called the:
Before the
presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt and his New Deal policies in the 1930’s,
and consistent with the intent of the Constitution’s framers, what was the
strongest branch of the government?
1. What is the issue you have chosen? Write a
paragraph (or no more than a page) explaining what it is about this issue that
is important to you. Why is it an important issue to you? How does it affect
your life, family, friends, and community?
2. The second part concerns your
representative’s views or position on the issue you have chosen. After you have
identified who your representatives are (described below), write a few
sentences or paragraph on where EACH of your Five representatives at all three
levels of government stands on the issue you care about. What is THEIR position
on the issue you have chosen? Do not tell me where they stand on other
issues—stick to your issue. Write up whatever information you are able to find
for all five of your representatives (Again, see below—and the handout—for
sources to find out how to identify who your representatives are). 3. The third and final part concerns your
reaction to what you find out. Write a page about how you feel and what you
think about where your representatives stand on your issue. Now that you know
that they agree/disagree, what might you be willing and able to do about it,
given what you have learned in the course thus far? Make sure to write a
summary of your reactions about what you learned. This can also include what
you learned about the processes of how you went about obtaining information
about who your representatives are and what their positions are in regards to
your issue. ( Who Represents Me: NYC (mygovnyc.org) BROOKLYN MUSEUM, BROOKLYN, NY
Your FIVE
Representatives at each of the three levels of government are:
Federal
a. Your elected official in the House of
Representatives b. One U.S. Senator – in NY, either Kirsten
Gillibrand or Charles Schumer.
State
a. Your representative in the NY State Assembly
(or the same if you live in another state).
b. Your representative in the NY State Senate
(or ditto if in another state)
City
a. Your city council person
There are many
ways to reach your representatives. The websites below are very helpful,
especially the first few. You can
contact them by phone, email, by in writing, or by going to their district
office, which may be close to your home. Also, many representatives have a
website about where they stand on issues.
INTEREST
GROUPS: You can also find out information on all your representatives from an
interest group that focuses on the issue you have chosen. Some of these groups
will have plenty of information on candidates and officials—even ranking
them—and provide other useful web links. These interest groups know where your
representative’s stand on the issue they care about—that is part of their
job! You can search the web or look in
the phone book for such groups.