Chapter 3: Atmospheric Dispersion, Transport, and Deposition, pp. 77–98 Chapter

Chapter 3: Atmospheric Dispersion, Transport, and Deposition, pp. 77–98 Chapter 7: Air Quality and Emissions Assessment, pp. 269–277 Instructions
As a continuation of our course project due in Unit VII (A Permit by Rule (PBR) Evaluation for Painting Operation Facility), complete the next section—VOC Content Minus Water and Exempt Solvents—of your proposal by following the instructions carefully, and then submit your continued draft of your evaluation document into Blackboard for grading. Closely read the required reading assignment from the textbook as well as the unit lesson in the study guide. Open your proposal draft from Unit V, and make any improvements to your draft, using your professor’s feedback from the Unit V Mini Project. Open the Unit VI Study Guide, read the Unit VI Lesson, and then review the calculations demonstrated and explained regarding VOC content minus water and exempt solvent calculations for our scenario. Be sure to use the scenario data instead of the data used in the study guide examples.
Make your Unit VI work the fifth level 1 heading titled “VOC Content Minus Water and Exempt Solvents.†Describe the environmental, health, and safety (EHS) implications of the work system while pulling from the textbook as well as any other relevant sources that are presented in the unit lesson in the study guide. In your description of the EHS implications of the system, be sure to discuss the methods for sampling, quantitatively analyzing, and evaluating air quality. Perform and present (not hand-written, but neatly typed) the calculations for the following in this section of your project: (a) gallons of water in one gallon of coating, (b) gallons of exempt solvent (ES) in one gallon of coating, and (c) pounds of VOC in one gallon of coating (less the water and ES) per day. Determine if the work system is still going to need any administrative controls to keep it is compliance with the state requirements. In your abstract section (page 2 of the document), write one or two sentences that reflect your work for this unit. Remember that we are adding one sentence per unit to reflect our work as we go, with the final abstract length being about 8 to 10 sentences long. Your narrative and calculations for operational air emission rates must be presented in at least 200 words (minimum). You are required to use at least one outside source, which may be your textbook. All sources used, including the textbook, must be referenced; paraphrased and quoted material must have accompanying APA citations. CACULATIONS EXAMPLE BELOW For our first set of calculations, we will be calculating the short-term (hourly) emissions generated from the heater. The following formula would apply: Lbs of air contaminants/hour = lbs air contaminant x 1.0 scf x 2.1 MMBtu MMscf 1,020Btu 1.0 hr First, we reference our scenario for the technical information referenced for the Interior Liner Cure heater and see that our natural-gas fired cure heater has a firing rate of 2.1 MMBtu/hr, and that we anticipate firing liners in the curing process for a maximum of 2,500 hours/year. We then reference each contaminant limit as tabulated here for our course project (use these tabulated values in your course project calculations): Title Contaminant Categories NOx CO PM VOC SO2 Mass Equivalent (lb/MMscf) 100.0 84.0 7.6 5.5 0.6 Note that NOx content is tabulated as100 lb/MMscf (lbs/million scf). Next, we multiply 100 lb NOx/MMscf by 1 scf/1,020 Btu by 2.1 MMBtu/hr to derive a value for lbs of NOx/hr. For example, for a tabulated 200.0 lb/ MMscf, [Note: The actual scenario needs to be calculated with actual tabulated value of NOx at 100.0 lb MMscf]: Lbs of air contaminants/hour = lb air contaminant x 1.0 scf x 2.1 MMBtu MMscf 1,020Btu 1.0 hr = 200.0 lb/MMscf x 1.0/1,20 Btu x 2.1 MMBtu/1.0 hr = 0.412 lb of NOx/hr Now, we simply do the same calculation for each of the remaining four individual contaminant categories tabulated for our scenario (lb of CO/hr, lb of PM/hr, lb of VOC/hr, and lb of SO2/hr). For our second set of calculations, we will be calculating the long-term (annual) emissions generated from the heater. In order to accomplish this, we simply convert the hourly emissions (performed above) to annual emissions (2,500 hours/yr), and then to tons (2,000 lbs/ton) to derive an annual tons of air contaminant per year. The following formula would apply: Tons of air contaminant/hour = lbs air contaminant x 2,500 hr x 1.0 ton 1.0 hr 1.0 yr 2,000 lb For example, our first unit conversion would be for NOx. First, we note that our calculated hourly NOx is 0.412 lb/hr. Second, we multiply the calculated lb of NOx/hr by 2,500 hrs/yr by 1 ton/2,000 lb to derive a value for ton NOx/yr. For example, for a calculated 0.412 lb of NOx/hr, [Note: The actual scenario needs to be calculated with actual calculated value of NOx at 100.0 lb/MMscf or 0.206 lb of NOx/hr]: MEE 6501, Advanced Air Quality Control 4 Tonsofaircontaminant/hour =lbsaircontaminantUxN2IT,5x00SThUrDxYG1.U0IDtoEn 1.0 hr 1.0 yr 2,000 lb Title = 0.412 lb of NOx/1.0 hr x 2,500 hr/1.0 yr x 1.0 ton/2,000 lb = 0.515 ton of NOx/yr Now, we simply do the same calculation for each of the remaining four individual contaminant categories tabulated for our scenario (ton of CO/yr, ton of PM/yr, ton of VOC/yr, and ton of SO2/yr).